Welcome to the Connecticut Employment Lawyers Association

The Connecticut Employment Lawyers Association (CELA) is a nonprofit organization comprised of employment law attorneys from around the state who share in a common mission; providing quality representation to employees and vindicating employees’ rights.

To that end, CELA’s members work collaboratively to:

  • Promote and increase public awareness of the rights of individual employees;
  • Furnish educational opportunities for attorneys who represent employees;
  • Assist lawyers who actively represent employees in employment related disputes by:
  • Providing ready access to knowledgeable colleagues;
  • Relieving the sense of professional isolation experienced by many employment lawyers who practice in solo or small firms; and
  • Promoting social and cultural exchange among attorneys and other interested groups.
  • Promote the intellectual and professional interests of attorneys who represent employees;
  • Provide the public with accessibility to skilled legal counsel who are well versed and accomplished in the complex area of employment law; and
  • Provide educational training and instructional activities for members, the general bar and for the public.

Connecticut Employment Lawyers Association Weekly

Topic of the Week  Dumb & Dumbest: Reducing Distorted Thinking at Work

DON’T jump to conclusions or make assumptions.
DON’T discount yourself.
DON’T blame yourself.
DON’T practice all or nothing thinking.

Dumb & Dumbest: Reducing Distorted Thinking at Work

There is a lot of distorted and destructive thinking in corporations today. Don’t believe me? Then I’d like to hear your explanation for the massive implosions at Enron, Washington Mutual, Lehman Brothers, etc. Which all reminds me of a Colorado man who claimed he was shot as he was trying to defend himself from a mugger. After searching the area for the assailants, police began to notice inconsistencies in the victim’s story. Eventually the man confessed that he’d made it all up to get a ride home from the police because he was out of cell phone minutes.

Unfortunately many of us shoot ourselves not with a gun, but with our own brand of distorted thinking at work. That’s why I’ll give you three Do’s and one Don’t to become a more realistic thinker. For more, check out Lisa Caldas Kappesser’s book "Smart Way to Get Hired" (Jist, 2010).

DON’T discount yourself. Good ideas, we’ve all had them. But often we’ll get the idea and then spend weeks discrediting it, and ourselves, for thinking of it. I adopt a different approach. I don’t assume that my idea is good or bad. I just develop it a bit inside my own head and then I bounce it off a few colleagues. I’ve had both some real winners, and some ideas that got rejected early on thanks to this approach.

DON’T jump to conclusions or make assumptions. Okay, we all know what assumptions can do to you and me (mostly it revolves around the first three letters in the word). We often can kill our own best ideas by leaping to conclusions about them and why they’ll never fly. Give yourself some credit, and avoid quick conclusions and assumptions and your ideas just may surprise you.

DON’T blame yourself. Which reminds me of a time when I was living with a woman and an old friend came to visit. The romantic relationship was on its last legs and things hit the fan during my friend’s visit. I ended up moving out midway through his stay. I told him that it all had nothing to do with him. But years later, he still thought it was all his fault. We have to be careful of our tendency to hold ourselves accountable for things that are way outside of our responsibilities and pay grade.

DON’T practice all or nothing thinking. Splitting the difference works great in many negotiations, and it also can be helpful when you’re trying to break out of old thought patterns. Be wary of seeing the world as black and white or right and wrong. I’ve found that the world is chock full of thousands of shades of gray. Another way to look at this is to look for the second right answer. Instead of immediately assuming that something must either be this or that, take the time to see if there are more solutions available to you.

Follow these tips and you’ll never become a victim of your own actions. Your ideas will thrive.

About The Author: Bob Rosner is a best-selling author and award-winning journalist. For free job and work advice, check out the award-winning workplace911.com. Check the revised edition of his Wall Street Journal best seller, "The Boss’s Survival Guide." If you have a question for Bob, contact him via bob@workplace911.com.
 

Thought of the Week

“If I had to reduce the responsibilities of a good follower to a single rule, it would be to speak truth to power.”

–Warren Bennis

Weekly Comic by Jerry King

Blog of the Week

Walmart raises minimum pay again, while Sam’s Club closes many stores

Walmart wants you to read the good news: it’s raising its minimum wage from -10 to an hour, and expanding paid parental leave benefits. Donald Trump wants you to read that the company is giving credit for that move to the recent Republican corporate tax cuts. Neither of them wants you to think much about the years-long worker organizing campaign to demand improved wages and benefits, and they definitely don’t want you to think about the news that also just came out that Sam’s Club, the Walmart warehouse chain, is closing dozens of stores, if not more.

Top Five News Headlines

  1. American women are angry and this new podcast wants to hear their stories
  2. Paying tipped workers better wouldn’t lead to fewer restaurant jobs
  3. NAACP Honors Memphis Sanitation Workers Who Went On Strike In 1968
  4. Workplace Raids Signal Shifting Tactics in Immigration Fight
  5. Workplace Lawyers Race Against the Trump Clock

List of the Week

from Dr. John Izzo

Why People Don’t Step Up at Work: The Top Three Reasons

  • Leaders making decisions without seeking input, 64%
  • Leaders dismissing ideas without exploring the ideas, 38%
  • People not getting rewarded or recognized for playing outside the lines, 26%

Archive